For disillusioned hacks… and anyone else believing in better news

Constructive journalism deconstructs news, reframing reporting to highlight solutions not just problems. Highly recommended for disillusioned hacks (including me)!”said one of our recent freelance workshop participants.
“It has generated ongoing discussion about the concept of a constructive approach to news stories… We will embed this into our practice”, wrote a journalism college programme leader.
For most people, December is a time of reflection on the year past. For us, it is March, as it is a year this week since we started our first-ever university tour.
In the past twelve months, we have been travelling the UK and beyond to deliver courses in constructive journalism. We worked with the University of Southampton, which was awarded funding by the Impact Acceleration programme at the Economic and Social Research Council to disseminate the findings of research into the impact of the news, conducted by Dr Denise Baden and colleagues.
We taught hundreds of students from Scotland to north Wales and the east coast of England, and went from Germany to Ireland and Italy to work with media professionals in newsrooms, too.
Next month, we’ll wrap up the university tour after more than twenty visits and overwhelmingly positive feedback from both students and professors. We’ll take some time to evaluate the tour and hope to be back with a second round in the next academic year.
Meanwhile, at our headquarters in London, we welcomed dozens of freelancers to not just practice constructive journalism, but make a living from it. The one-day course has been attended by journalists across countries, platforms and age groups, with many currently working on their own constructive journalism ventures in Europe. The next workshop is announced for Friday 15 July and booking is now open to all, on a first-come, first-served basis.
And industry media increasingly know where to find us when covering the constructive journalism movement. Journalism.co.uk recently featured us again in a podcast: ‘Why solutions journalism can help news organisations improve their reporting’, and the World Association of Newspapers zoomed in on our latest constructive journalism magazine experiences. BBC Radio Ulster also paid attention to our work (listen back from 1:25:00) and many bloggers find their way to us too, including under the header ‘What Now For News’ on the Huffington Post.
As the momentum for more constructive news keeps building, we hope you join us in changing the conversation. You can connect with us on Twitter, Facebook or via our newsletter, and of course face-to-face. To find out where we are next, keep an eye on our schedule here.